Staff Retention in the Hotel Industry


Working in the Hospitality Sector brings considerable challenges with staff shortages and staff retention. It is an industry that can be rewarding as well as highly stressful. With its fast pace and exacting standards, people often operate at levels not mentally comfortable.


Hotels find themselves in a candidate-led market, and staff recruitment of quality candidates is increasingly demanding. In these challenging times, it is imperative to provide an excellent culture and work environment to your current staff on the ground who are already facing the stresses of doing the additional work required with, more often than not, a skeleton or unskilled staff in place.


Management oversight and vigilance here are paramount. Where communication lines break down, or an underbelly of undervaluing employees exists or is perceived to exist, an atmosphere of toxicity will invariably flourish. 


There can be many examples of toxicity in the workplace:


  1. Lack of clear direction and communication from the business’s leadership and lack of transparency with unclear policies and responsibilities lead to confusion and a dysfunctional work environment. 
  2. Low Morale – Employees feel professionally or financially undervalued, and the management hierarchy does not appreciate their input.
  3. Management’s explicit refusal to address a situation of an aggrieved employee. 
  4. There is constant gossip and drama and established cliques. 
  5. Bullying in the workplace


How do we battle against such toxic environments?


Managers should be receptive to conversations and exercise an open-door policy regarding all employee issues. For example, discussing inclusion and diversity amongst employees, creating clear guidelines and policies on these essential issues, and holding weekly, bi-weekly or monthly one-to-one and group meetings to discuss objectives and requirements in the role. 


Offering training and mentorship to employees who may lack a particular job skill. Implement team bonding exercises and excursions into the business allowing employees to become friendly and encourage a more collaborative approach to the office culture. 


Where problems persist and are left lingering, a business will risk losing top talent and critical employees. Moreover, this lousy practice may have additional legal and reputational consequences for the company. Working in the Hospitality Sector brings considerable challenges with staff shortages and staff retention. 


It is an industry that can be rewarding as well as highly stressful. With its fast pace and exacting standards, people often operate at levels not mentally comfortable.

Hotels find themselves in a candidate-led market, and staff recruitment of quality candidates is increasingly demanding. 


In these challenging times, it is imperative to provide an excellent culture and work environment to your current staff on the ground who are already facing the stresses of doing the additional work required with, more often than not, a skeleton or unskilled staff in place.


Management oversight and vigilance here are paramount. Where communication lines break down, or an underbelly of undervaluing employees exists or is perceived to exist, an atmosphere of toxicity will invariably flourish. 

 

There can be many examples of toxicity in the workplace:

 

  1. Lack of clear direction and communication from the business’s leadership and lack of transparency with unclear policies and responsibilities lead to confusion and a dysfunctional work environment.
  2. Low Morale – Employees feel professionally or financially undervalued, and the management hierarchy does not appreciate their input.
  3. Management’s explicit refusal to address a situation of an aggrieved employee. 
  4. There is constant gossip and drama and established cliques. 
  5. Bullying in the workplace

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.